Why Aren't Racing Games Fun Anymore ?




Modern racing games, whilst packing all the graphical bells and whistles, in their pursuit of imitating reality they forgot how to be fun.

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14 thoughts on “Why Aren't Racing Games Fun Anymore ?

  • February 6, 2018 at 10:45 pm
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    Was a lot of fun revisiting an old PS2 title. Now that I can record PS2 gameplay, a couple of titles I might check out are The Simpsons Hit and Run and 007 Nightfire, I'm interested to hear your thoughts.

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  • February 6, 2018 at 11:25 pm
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    Trackmania united can't be played on windows 10 anymore 🙁

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  • February 6, 2018 at 11:28 pm
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    Damn, seeing your GT3 gameplay brings back sooo many memories. Must have sunk at least 2000 hours in that game back in the days! Difficult games that don't hold your hand still have my preference to this day.

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  • February 7, 2018 at 12:44 am
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    PS2 games in general have a lot more soul than many releases today.

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  • February 7, 2018 at 1:38 am
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    To be honest I can't really say much regarding this issue, mostly because I never was much of a racer player.

    That being said I still hold Race Driver Grid (the first one) and Burnout Paradise in high regard, both awesome games with completely different moods.

    Also the example you gave in relation to the music used in today's titles resonated with me since Grid had a great soundtrack that knew when to be either calm and subdued or bombastic when it needed to be.

    Thanks for the video.

    Reply
  • February 7, 2018 at 2:10 am
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    Really enjoyed this. Shame not much people will get to see it but great video in general. Yes the racing genre has really been milked out recently due to manufacturers greed but I guess that’s what the kids are after when they’re playing forza now. The latest and greatest. I still play GT4 quite often and I still reminisce when playing it, thinking back in my childhood days… just unlocking a new series, a new race, a new car felt like it had a sense of accomplishment and achievement compared to modern racing games today. And the soundtrack 😌 brings back the good times. It felt like a one off. A game that was 100% during release and stayed 100% during its lifespan. Unlike most titles where they would realest at a half finished state which really does bug me. But oh well I guess they just don’t make them like they used to

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  • February 7, 2018 at 8:00 am
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    Great video like always and very true!
    Congratulations again for surpassing Your 'Mille'stone! ^^

    – Excuse me for my rambling in advance –

    Somehow I feel it's just another symptom of today's culture.

    Like I wrote in my last comment, in somewhat different words: today's games want to get sold as quickly and with as much profit as possible.

    And time has changed.
    From about 10 or so games per year people spent 100 hours in each to 100 games a year with 0-10 hours each.
    And I guess 'blowing their full load in the first 5 seconds' seems enough 'entertainment' to get people to spent 30-60 bucks, because hype.
    It's like a TV ad.
    A quick awesome commercial for some random thing, which looks cool (in some different universe), but in reality, it's just bling bling, as deep as a puddle and as handy a 'life hack'.
    Also YouTubers, streamers ('Twitchers'?!) and other 'influencers' (unlike Sean Vanaman thinks) surely promote the hype and increase sales, instead the other way around.

    And like I wrote, the 2000s were different.
    Just think of the most notable or popular games today, and when the IP was originally created: Call Of Duty, Battlefield, Assassin's Creed, Far Cry, Mafia, Couterstrike, the Tom Clancy games and in it's 'modern form' Doom, Fallout, Elder Scrolls, GTA,…
    They were fresh, new, creative, rich in detail, innovative, and imagine that: free from 'mirco'transactions and lootboxes.
    It feels like today, we only get the same 10 IPs every year, getting more and more repetitive, duller and duller, more and more try hard, hyperer and hyperer, vaster and vaster, shallower and shallower.

    And I feel that way not only in games, but movies (the Lord Of The Rings, the Marvels, the Transformers, Superheroes all together…), or series (season 269 of Game Of Breaking Bang), and culture overall.
    It's like Groundhog Day, over and over, again and again.
    Meanwhile female models are sexist (especially 'attractive' ones), region locks are racist, SiFi game relationships are homophobic, every day something different to rage about yet every other day there is something so good, so great, so hype.
    Welcome to the Hype(r) Rage Age.

    Reply
  • February 7, 2018 at 10:35 am
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    Did you play gt sport? One of the best online racers of the decade

    Amazing graphics and the gt league is reminiscent of older gt simulation modes.

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  • February 9, 2018 at 1:20 am
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    Seriously I do not see any regression except in the Forza Horizon series.

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  • March 15, 2018 at 10:13 pm
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    You are playing crappy racing games, try Assetto Corsa I am quite certain it will change your opinion on "modern" racing games.

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  • October 21, 2019 at 5:32 pm
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    I just want proper progression systems to come back. I remember the days on gran turismo 3 and seeing a handful of cars that had a price tag of “- – – -“.
    That made me so much more enticed to get those special non purchasable cars just so that I could brag.
    In modern racing games they are all purchasable or just handed to you immediately

    Reply

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