Yellowed Nintendo NES restoration and repair. What's inside this one?




Restoring the original Gameboy got me really interested in restoring and repairing more of these old gaming consoles like this Nintendo NES along side with the knives, tools, etc. I might move into other old electronics as well. I haven’t really done much this type of work ever but with every project I learn and get better.

For the disassembly I used a Phillips screwdriver, except for the screws on the top half of the shell. Those had a weird type of screw that could still be opened with a flathead. There was a pit in the middle of the slot, so the screwdriver would be a flathead with a “spike” in the middle. I have not seen those before. No real trick here. Try to remember which screw came where, or film it like me. And don’t loose the screws!

Removing the controllers’ and buttons’ cords from the board was much harder than it looks. I probably spent 2 minutes just wiggling them from side to side until they came loose.

For cleaning up the boards I used a small airbrush compressor which I have. This blew off all the loose dirt and dust. After this I used Isopropylic alcohol to clean up the rest and remove some corrosion. I works really well and doesn’t corrode the parts. After cleaning everything I tested that the console works before putting it back together.

The shell was quite yellowed and had some stains, maybe from stickers. It was also very dirty and more dirt was found from inside. No wonder it had some issues. I sed the same method for “retrobrighting” the shell than I used with the SNES. I only did a little upgrade to the “solarium”. I added a baking sheet that will disperse the light so that the lighting will be more even. I think the optimal method would be to have a clear box inside the solarium and the parts submerged in hydrogen peroxide. With this method I don’t need as much hydrogen peroxide but I need to be watching that the hydrogen peroxide wont dry too much or something because that may cause patchy results.

Basically what was done is that I mixed 12% hydrogenperoxide with gelatin to make it less runny (this doesn’t work extremely well. I’ll do something better after I’ve used this batch up). After this I wrapped the whole thin in cling film to prevent the liquid from evaporating. The items were then put into a box with UV-led strips. I’ve tested that the temperature in the box (read MY box) won’t go much above 50 degrees Celsius with I feel, won’t cause a fire hazard, or melt the plastic.

After this I just cleaned the parts from the liquid and let them dry before assembly. Fun fact: I spent a long time making the timelapse. There is probably +100 cuts in the clip, it’s not just speeded up video 😉

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Check out my new Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/odd.tinkering/
Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/oddtinkering

SOME TOOLS FROM THIS PROJECT:
SCREW DRIVER SET: https://amzn.to/2F3n6kO
HYDROGEN PEROXIDE: https://amzn.to/2K5OmTS
UV LED STRIP: https://amzn.to/2IqLmOA

SOME OF MY OTHER TOOLS:
SANDING PADS: https://amzn.to/2ICDr2i
SCORLL SAW: https://amzn.to/31Eblej
POWER FILE: https://amzn.to/2URHvPq
CHUCK NORRIS’ TOOTHBRUSH: https://amzn.to/2YfXUj2
CORDLESS DRILL: https://amzn.to/2Wois77
BETTER ROTARY TOOL: https://amzn.to/2WF75I6
PRESS FOR ROTARY TOOL: https://amzn.to/2Uiv1Eu
2-AXIS TABLE FOR THE PRESS https://amzn.to/2WPkttl

MY FILMING GEAR:
MAIN CAMERA: https://amzn.to/2JvtKox
MAIN TRIPOD: https://amzn.to/2OlpYgn
MICROPHONE: https://amzn.to/2I80iDz
VIDEO LIGHTS: https://amzn.to/2FpJDaB
MAIN LENS: https://amzn.to/2Fm8yMk
CINEMATIC LENS: https://amzn.to/2TmNdHH
WIDE ANGLE LENS: https://amzn.to/2U7iJha
GOPRO: https://amzn.to/2U3eqU3

THE WATCH: https://amzn.to/2NpDMJJ

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SUBSCRIBE ▶▶▶ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf_s…
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Restoration playlist▶ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVIxIjRNxFv5VRUXt66VzBxOys1GpmBp4
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46 thoughts on “Yellowed Nintendo NES restoration and repair. What's inside this one?

  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    What!! I didn't even know that you made this video. 😲 I've been watching your videos for a good hot minute, but I guess you past right by me. Lol

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    It’s amazing how different this video is to your more recent ones and it’s only a years difference lol

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Wait… Is the Ducktor helping you restore the Nintendo, knowing fully that the game that you were testing out is Super Mario/DUCK HUNT? o.o

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    ahh so it’s a nintendo Nintendo Entertainment System, gotcha. (i know it’s for the sake of the title)

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    at this point, this screwdriver company needs to be sponsoring you. i literally just ordered a set lol it was a super reasonable price.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    0:51 when the snes cartridge door closes it sounds like it’s made of metal, idk why that stands out to me

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Surprised you didn't cut the connection to the security chip, that causes the blinking screen.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Would the I Fix It Pro and Mantra sets bee a good replacement for the yellow tool set he uses?
    Also, yes I know they are quite a bit more expensive.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Odd tinkering: reveals old nes console
    Me: oh it doesn’t look too dirty
    Odd tinkering: opens game slot
    Me: SWEET NEPTUNE

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Watching these makes me insanely happy. I don't know why though.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    I know this video is older but on that air line you can get an air gun that will fit on the on that air line and they are only like 10 dollars

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    The game might have worked if you blew into the cartridge a couple of times then put it back in the NES. Always try that first then if that doesn't work then you clean it!! LOL J/k

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    It's interesting how different the PAL version of the NES differs from the NTSC version in terms of 10 Frames Per Second.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    My first gaming console… I feel like a dinosaur right now 😀 , also the first game I ever played… good stuff

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    its crazy how far we've come with consoles ..gaming in general.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    I really appreciate that your videos arent verbally narrated so I can just focus on the beauty that is the system and hear all of the noises it alon and the textures on it make. It's like asmr for nerds.

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    when retrobrighting, it's not the best idea to use cling wrap to hold the cream to the plastic parts. That can cause some nasty streaking on the plastic as a result of uneven coating. the best way is to submerge the parts in water then put the retrobright chemical into the water. You can use a stove to heat a small container or even leave a bigger container outside in the sun.

    Reply
  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    What this taught me is that my Gamecube with similar picture quality issues is probably dirty and I can fix that with a compressed air can, some rubbing alcohol and a toothbrush 🤔

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    did you intentionally line up the unscrewing and opening of the NES the same tune as the first stage of the game? I assume you did and I love it!!!!

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Im glad l can actually watch these video's without annoying music playing with it.
    Anyways 🍻 to all your work!!!

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Well as long as you don’t have epilepsy then he could have played it from the beginning

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    How do I learn how to restore old tech like this properly like you?

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    The before shot: yeah… so…
    The after shot: (car reveal angles)

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  • November 27, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    It's still better than mine. It turned on the first time.
    I spend about 45 minutes fighting the blinking light

    Reply

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